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TV Presenter Lends Support to World Exclusive Dinosaur Exhibition

Chris Packham is supporting the ground breaking Dinosaurs of China exhibition

The ground-breaking Dinosaurs of China exhibition, which is bringing some of the best-preserved dinosaur fossils in the world to the UK this summer, has a new high-profile supporter in the form of respected TV presenter and naturalist Chris Packham.

The wildlife expert is known for presenting popular nature programmes on TV, as well as a host of other projects. He has a lifelong passion for palaeontology and is keen to help tell the story of dinosaur evolution through the exhibits on show.

Featuring the massive Mamenchisaurus, the tallest mounted dinosaur skeleton in the UK, and the amazing Gigantoraptor, the largest bird-like feathered dinosaur in the world, the 26 exhibits have been hand-picked to take visitors on a journey through time and show how dinosaurs evolved from ground shakers of the past to the birds we see in our gardens today.

As well as 3D skeletons there will be replica and original fossils on display including two type specimens, regarded as the best examples of those species anywhere in the world.

Chris said: “The way dinosaurs have evolved is truly fascinating and I’m passionate about spreading the message far and wide. Dinosaurs have long been perceived as huge scaly beasts but now we’re finding out that this was only part of the story. This exhibition provides a real once-in-a-lifetime chance to see some of the most exciting dinosaur discoveries in recent years and learn more about how dinosaurs actually looked when they roamed the Earth.”

Opening in Nottingham on July 1, Dinosaurs of China is a collaboration between Nottingham City Council and the University of Nottingham who have worked closely with the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing and the Long Hao Institute of Geology and Paleontology Inner Mongolia.

Dr Adam Smith is the exhibition curator and said: “We are extremely excited to be bringing together such an interesting collection of specimens, and delighted that Chris is supporting us.  He shares our enthusiasm and understands the importance of the Dinosaurs of China exhibition. Several of the fossils on display are globally significant because they show that some dinosaurs had feathers. Many of the species have only been discovered in the past 20 years, and one was named just two years ago, so we really are showing these new discoveries to the world.”

Jason Feehily, Director Knowledge Exchange Asia at the University of Nottingham, said: “We are delighted to have Chris join the Dinosaurs of China team. Chris has an enormous reputation and stature in this area and to have him as a supporter demonstrates both the scientific and cultural importance of the Dinosaurs of China exhibition. I am hugely impressed by Chris’s passion and enthusiasm and we are all really looking forward to working with him over the coming months.”

Cllr Dave Trimble, Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture at Nottingham City Council added: “Thanks to the special relationship forged with China by the University of Nottingham and Nottingham City Council, we have this unique opportunity to host a natural history exhibition of international significance in our city, which will be a tremendous boost both to tourism and the local economy.”

Taking place from 1st July to 29th October 2017, the exhibition will span two sites – Wollaton Hall in Nottingham and University of Nottingham’s public art centre, Lakeside Arts. Tickets for Wollaton Hall are now on sale. Prices are £7.70 for an adult and £5.50 for a child. There is a family ticket (2 adults and 2 children) for £22.00. Children under five go free and the event welcomes school parties at a reduced price. Entry to Lakeside is free of charge.

www.dinosaursofchina.co.uk

Posted on 28 April 2017

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